Mimispring

I live on both sides of the fence. And my grass is always green.

alckemi:

royymustang:

Edward “I’m here to fuck shit up” Elric

Alphonse “Brother no” Elric

Perfectly accurate

theartofanimation:

Kemineko

Reno of the Turks
     Please don’t repost!

slumbermancer:

THE  DOCTOR  IS  IN
YOUR  BRAIN  AGE  IS  DEATH

slumbermancer:

THE  DOCTOR  IS  IN

YOUR  BRAIN  AGE  IS  DEATH

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.
Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]
The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.
It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.
It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.
White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.
Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.
People seriously need to learn some history.THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.

Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]

The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.

The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.

It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.

It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.

White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.

Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.

People seriously need to learn some history.
THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

kisu-no-hi:

People who try to force writers/artists to write/draw what they want

image

americanninjax:

animationforce:

Have you heard? Dreamworks Animation and Studio Mir, the company behind Nickelodeon’s The Legend of Korra, announced Thursday they will work together to produce up to four new animated television series in the next four years. 
This is huge both because a Korean company has never partnered on such a large scale with an American animation group, and because these shows will be created in 2D animation. I’m ecstatic!
It’s great to see that Korean animation is being taken seriously enough to be treated as a creative equal rather than just as a source of cheap production. Studio Mir’s work is undeniably beautiful, and if Mir’s talent can be combined with the storytelling prowess exhibited in How to Train Your Dragon 2, I will be a very happy customer. 
An article inthe Korea Herald had the following to say: 

“The contract with DreamWorks is meaningful since we will be working as partners,” Studio Mir founder and executive producer Yoo Jae-myung said.
“This has never been done before by a Korean studio.”
 A Studio Mir spokesman said details regarding the titles of the cartoons could not be revealed, but that they would be in 2-D.

This is great news for both companies, since each has had some fairly concerning press in the past few weeks, between the financial troubles of Dreamworks Animation (now under direction of new chief financial officer Fazal Merchant) and the on-again/off-again nature of Korra Book Three, now safely on Nick.com. 
Speaking of The Legend of Korra, Studio Mir uploaded a lovely picture on Facebook yesterday thanking fans for their support of Book Three. 

- Courtney (HarmonicaCave)

Hadn’t heard about this at all. That’s awesome.

americanninjax:

animationforce:

Have you heard? Dreamworks Animation and Studio Mir, the company behind Nickelodeon’s The Legend of Korra, announced Thursday they will work together to produce up to four new animated television series in the next four years. 

This is huge both because a Korean company has never partnered on such a large scale with an American animation group, and because these shows will be created in 2D animation. I’m ecstatic!

It’s great to see that Korean animation is being taken seriously enough to be treated as a creative equal rather than just as a source of cheap production. Studio Mir’s work is undeniably beautiful, and if Mir’s talent can be combined with the storytelling prowess exhibited in How to Train Your Dragon 2, I will be a very happy customer. 

An article inthe Korea Herald had the following to say: 

“The contract with DreamWorks is meaningful since we will be working as partners,” Studio Mir founder and executive producer Yoo Jae-myung said.

“This has never been done before by a Korean studio.”

 A Studio Mir spokesman said details regarding the titles of the cartoons could not be revealed, but that they would be in 2-D.

This is great news for both companies, since each has had some fairly concerning press in the past few weeks, between the financial troubles of Dreamworks Animation (now under direction of new chief financial officer Fazal Merchant) and the on-again/off-again nature of Korra Book Three, now safely on Nick.com

Speaking of The Legend of Korra, Studio Mir uploaded a lovely picture on Facebook yesterday thanking fans for their support of Book Three. 

From Studio Mir's Facebook page

- Courtney (HarmonicaCave)

Hadn’t heard about this at all. That’s awesome.

youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

Confess something you’ve thought about me on anon, and all I can do is post it


Lovely pink (by amethyst)

Lovely pink (by amethyst)

saccstry:

Crystals! 

saccstry:

Crystals! 

kfkx:

だるいガールシールその2

kfkx:

だるいガールシールその2

Riverbell themes